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review management

Smart business owners and managers know how important it is to share negative customer reviews with their entire team.

Why? Because candid feedback from customers creates a unique opportunity for the business to do better next time. It provides information on what customers really think, or what aspects of the customer experience can be improved. Is there an operational policy that needs to be changed? Does the staff need extra hours of training? Does the actual product need tweaks? What needs to be done to prevent bad reviews and ensure excellent customer service?

Questions like these can be addressed if your team is tuned in to what customers are saying about the business on online review sites.

Why share positive reviews with employees? 

A number of businesses make it a point to connect with employees and staff members whenever the business receives a negative review. But it’s hard to imagine the same number of people making a point to share positive reviews.

If you’re managing your business presence on online review sites, we definitely recommend you share great customer feedback and five-star ratings. Don’t keep them to yourself!

Sharing positive reviews can boost staff morale & employee satisfaction. 

It’s a powerful way of making your team feel that they’re doing a great job, and that they’re making very real contributions that you’re not taking for granted. No matter how you do it – pinning the printed reviews on the office corkboard or forwarding them on a team-wide E-mail – sharing positive customer feedback is definitely a morale booster.

Sharing positive reviews drowns out the negativity. 

It’s not going to be a happy, enthusiastic workplace if you’re only sharing harsh comments and one-star reviews. It’s all about the attitude of the team!

Some teams that focus exclusively on the negative end up hating their jobs. Or they end up believing that every customer carries the threat of a bad Yelp review instead of the opportunity to create a positive experience. By sharing positive reviews, you can broaden your staff’s perspectives and drown out the negativity that might be affecting performance.

Sharing positive reviews helps establish a standard. 

They can help demonstrate the kind of work that you, as a business owner or manager, believe the whole team should be striving towards. Keep an eye out for five-star reviews that gives a shout-out to a specific employee. Not only is this a great way of identifying and recognizing team members who do a great job; it’s also a way of inspiring the rest of the team to follow their example.

Sharing positive reviews can help build brand evangelists. 

Loyal, happy customers can be your most powerful sales force. But guess who else can spread positive vibes and great word of mouth about your business? That’s right. Your employees.

By sharing positive reviews, you can instill in your team the belief that, through their jobs, they’re helping solve real-world problems. (Those great reviews are proof of it!) When that happens, you’ll be able to ignite the most vibrant and powerful brand evangelists you can have. (They may even help your business recruit top talent!)

Sharing positive reviews promotes engagement. 

Don’t be limited to managing only negative reviews; manage positive ones, too. And do so as a team. Talk about how you can make happy customers happier. And leverage those five-star raves to build your brand reputation and reinforce the best aspects of your business.

By sharing positive reviews to your team, you help foster a culture of engagement and empower your team to connect meaningfully with every customer.

Crystal Shuller

Crystal is the Director of Customer Happiness for ReviewTrackers. She's known around the office for E-mails that make everyone smile, and she has a bag of tricks and tips to help businesses solve their problems and delight their customers.

Discussion

  1. MartinjukM

    Reading this post a question comes to mind; can one give too much praise to their team? Should I put an emphasis only on positive reviews or can taking time to point out the negative ones also influence the productivity in a sort of a ‘wake-up call’ kind of way?

    Reply
  2. Rylan Howie

    I believe that the praise itself is not much of a productivity-booster. Some concrete boosts, like a raise perhaps, can be a much more powerful driving force for your employees 🙂

    But, then again, if your employees are lazy and bored of life itself – there’s nothing you can do to change that. It’s all in their heads, and they are the ones who need to change their heads.

    @MartinjukM – There are people who, when you tell them something (whether it be praise or rant) are actually worth telling; they know what to do with either of these, they just know how to decipher these messages. But, on some people (employees) words are just wasted – they don’t know what to do with either praise or rant; their performance is the same. I use all three methods (including bonuses) actually in my communication with employees, and I can safely say – it just depends on what’s in your employees’ heads 🙂

    Reply
    • Arnoldi

      Yeah. I think that a raise is better than a pat on the back.

      Reply
  3. FirenzeZ

    I agree that sharing positive reviews can boost employee morale, but what about sharing negative reviews, so they can learn from their mistakes? If I am going to share the good stuff with my team members then I am going to share the bad as well. That way we can work on getting even better by eliminating the bad factors and upgrading the good ones to an even higher level. So, my opinion is that you should share both good and bad reviews with your employee and try making the best out of them.

    Reply
  4. Screechy Rich

    “Smart business owners and managers know how important it is to share negative customer reviews with their entire team.”

    Negative reviews? If you are an employee, every owner/manager would throw it in your face, because it always somebody else’s fault. Positive reviews are considered as a result of good management and they often take credit for job well done. In this case, smart owner/manager is the one who shares POSITIVE reviews with employees and praise them for their contribution.

    Reply
  5. Fridtjof Salomon

    My ex-boss could learn something from this blog.

    Reply
  6. Heinrich Sture

    I completely agree with this text. There’s nothing better to boost your employees’ motivation than to show them what your customers think of the job they did.
    I think that printing those reviews and hanging them in your offices would be the great motivation.

    Reply
  7. Norman Nevelle

    There is no better way to run successful business then running it in a positive, no-pressure atmosphere. If reading positive reviews can help you do this, then, I don’t see why you shouldn’t do it.

    Reply
  8. Mary Rose

    I couldn’t agree more with this article and I always make it a point to discuss with my employees everything – the good and the bad. That way they start perceiving my business as their own and the good things that happen they perceive as their personal success. I find this strategy quite efficient in managing a business.

    Reply
  9. Dandundun

    And what about the negative reviews? Should they stay hidden from your employee’s and why? If positive reviews affect the employee’s positively, then the negative reviews are affecting them in a negative way? If they do something good and get praised that is fine, but what if the business got a negative reviews due to an employee mistake?

    Reply
  10. Screechy Rich

    people seem to be missing the point of this article. It’s not suggesting you just share positive reviews, but that both positive and negative reviews are integral for employees to remain motivated and improve.

    Reply
  11. David R

    It’s very important sharing good critics. your team feel great after good critics. in the other hand bad critics can you put down, but also can be very constructive. So, everything is good, it’s only about perspective.

    Reply
  12. Baseer Hannan

    It’s very important make a different between customer’s critic and boss’s critic. It’s not a same.

    Reply

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